Elon Musk calls for engineers, workers to move to Texas for SpaceX – CNET

50906488166-b1600b078e-k

Starship prototype SN9 before its fateful launch in Texas earlier this year.

SpaceX

SpaceX founder Elon Musk has a vision for the company’s presence in Texas where it’s rapidly building (and rapidly exploding) Starship spacecraft prototypes. He sees the area, which he has unofficially named Starbase, growing by several thousand people over the next couple of years.

Musk put out a plea on Tuesday for engineers, technicians and builders to relocate to Texas and join SpaceX. “Please consider moving to Starbase or greater Brownsville/South Padre area in Texas and encourage friends to do so!” Musk tweeted.

Musk called for “essential support personnel of all kinds.” A quick scan of open positions for Brownsville shows SpaceX is looking to hire plenty of engineers, but also cooks, safety technicians, welders, security officers, managers and crane operators.

SpaceX didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. 

Musk also said in a tweet Tuesday that he plans to donate $20 million to Cameron County schools and $10 million to nearby Brownsville to help revitalize the city’s downtown. He promised more details next week. 

The City of Brownsville Twitter account cheered the news, tweeting in response, “On the border, by the sea and beyond! Grateful for your support in making Brownsville a launching pad to Mars.”

The series of tweets about hiring and donations came on the same day SpaceX’s latest Starship prototype, SN11, exploded during a test flight. SpaceX is still trying to keep its test vehicles from blowing up during flight or shortly after landing. SN11’s demise appeared to scatter debris across a wide area.

There have been plenty of indications that Musk and SpaceX intend to turn a chunk of Texas into a teaming hub of space activity. Besides development and test flights, the company seems to have ambitions for creating a “21st century Spaceport” resort in Texas.

If all goes as planned, SpaceX’s Starbase might truly earn its sci-fi-inspired name.

Follow CNET’s 2021 Space Calendar to stay up to date with all the latest space news this year. You can even add it to your own Google Calendar.      

Source

%d bloggers like this: